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Gastroesophageal Motility Disorders Laboratory

Diagnosing Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

For appointments and information, please call (212) 746-5130

Proper diagnosis is the first step toward effective treatment. Individuals with GERD present with a variety of symptoms, including:

  • Heartburn
  • Regurgitation
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Hoarseness
  • Feeling a lump in the throat
  • Excess saliva
  • Chest pain
  • Bloating
  • Early Satiety
  • Belching
  • Nausea
  • Asthma
  • Wheezing
  • Chronic cough
  • Shortness of Breath
  • Recurrent Pneumonia

Symptoms alone are insufficient to make the diagnosis of GERD. Most patients will need some or all of the following tests to pinpoint the cause of symptoms:

  • X-ray (barium swallow) detects a hiatal hernia or a narrowing of the esophagus.
  • Endoscopy enables the physician to see inside the throat and into the stomach. In a diagnostic endoscopy, a thin, flexible tube equipped with a tiny camera and light is inserted through the mouth and down the throat.
  • Esophageal manometry shows how well the muscles of the esophagus are functioning. In our state-of-the art esophageal motility lab, we can obtain information about the functioning of the muscular valve located between the esophagus and the stomach (lower esophageal sphincter), and the ability of the esophageal muscles to squeeze (esophageal peristalsis).
  • Ambulatory pH monitoring measures the frequency and amount of gastric contents (acid and non-acid) that reflux from the stomach to the esophagus, usually over a 24-hour period. This test involves threading a very thin tube (catheter) through the nose and down the esophagus. The catheter is attached to a monitoring system. "Ambulatory" means that you can walk around and perform your normal activities while wearing this monitor.

Contact

Gastroesophageal Motility Disorders Facility
Directions
(212) 746-5130
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        Phone: (212) 746-6006
        Fax: (212) 746-8753
        Address: 525 E. 68th Street
        Starr 8
        New York, NY 10065
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